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Measurements of particle backscatter, extinction, and lidar ratio at 1064 nm with the rotational raman method in Polly-XT

2018, Engelmann, Ronny, Haarig, Moritz, Baars, Holger, Ansmann, Albert, Kottas, Michael, Marinou, Eleni, Nicolae, D., Makoto, A., Vassilis, A., Balis, D., Behrendt, A., Comeron, A., Gibert, F., Landulfo, E., McCormick, M.P., Senff, C., Veselovskii, I., Wandinger, U.

We replaced a 1064-nm interference filter of a Polly-XT lidar system by a 1058-nm filter to observe pure rotational Raman backscattering from atmospheric Nitrogen and Oxygen. Polly-XT is compact Raman lidar with a Nd:YAG laser (20 Hz, 200 mJ at 1064 nm) and a 30-cm telescope mirror which applies photomultipliers in photoncounting mode. We present the first measured signals at 1058 nm and the derived extinction profile from measurements aboard RV Polarstern and in Leipzig. In combination with another Polly-XT system we could also derive particle backscatter and lidar ratio profiles at 1064 nm.

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Is the near-spherical shape the "new black" for smoke?

2020, Gialitaki, Anna, Tsekeri, Alexandra, Amiridis, Vassilis, Ceolato, Romain, Paulien, Lucas, Kampouri, Anna, Gkikas, Antonis, Solomos, Stavros, Marinou, Eleni, Haarig, Moritz, Baars, Holger, Ansmann, Albert, Lapyonok, Tatyana, Lopatin, Anton, Dubovik, Oleg, Groß, Silke, Wirth, Martin, Tsichla, Maria, Tsikoudi, Ioanna, Balis, Dimitris

We examine the capability of near-sphericalshaped particles to reproduce the triple-wavelength particle linear depolarization ratio (PLDR) and lidar ratio (LR) values measured over Europe for stratospheric smoke originating from Canadian wildfires. The smoke layers were detected both in the troposphere and the stratosphere, though in the latter case the particles presented PLDR values of almost 18% at 532 nm as well as a strong spectral dependence from the UV to the near-IR wavelength. Although recent simulation studies of rather complicated smoke particle morphologies have shown that heavily coated smoke aggregates can produce large PLDR, herein we propose a much simpler model of compact near-spherical smoke particles. This assumption allows for the reproduction of the observed intensive optical properties of stratospheric smoke, as well as their spectral dependence. We further examine whether an extension of the current Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) scattering model to include the near-spherical shapes could be of benefit to the AERONET retrieval for stratospheric smoke cases associated with enhanced PLDR. Results of our study illustrate the fact that triple-wavelength PLDR and LR lidar measurements can provide us with additional insight when it comes to particle characterization. © 2020 Author(s).

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EARLINET evaluation of the CATS Level 2 aerosol backscatter coefficient product

2019, Proestakis, Emmanouil, Amiridis, Vassilis, Marinou, Eleni, Binietoglou, Ioannis, Ansmann, Albert, Wandinger, Ulla, Hofer, Julian, Yorks, John, Nowottnick, Edward, Makhmudov, Abduvosit, Papayannis, Alexandros, Pietruczuk, Aleksander, Gialitaki, Anna, Apituley, Arnoud, Szkop, Artur, Muñoz Porcar, Constantino, Bortoli, Daniele, Dionisi, Davide, Althausen, Dietrich, Mamali, Dimitra, Balis, Dimitris, Nicolae, Doina, Tetoni, Eleni, Liberti, Gian Luigi, Baars, Holger, Mattis, Ina, Stachlewska, Iwona Sylwia, Voudouri, Kalliopi Artemis, Mona, Lucia, Mylonaki, Maria, Perrone, Maria Rita, Costa, Maria João, Sicard, Michael, Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos, Siomos, Nikolaos, Burlizzi, Pasquale, Pauly, Rebecca, Engelmann, Ronny, Abdullaev, Sabur, Pappalardo, Gelsomina

We present the evaluation activity of the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) for the quantitative assessment of the Level 2 aerosol backscatter coefficient product derived by the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS; Rodier et al., 2015). The study employs correlative CATS and EARLINET backscatter measurements within a 50km distance between the ground station and the ISS overpass and as close in time as possible, typically with the starting time or stopping time of the EARLINET performed measurement time window within 90min of the ISS overpass, for the period from February 2015 to September 2016. The results demonstrate the good agreement of the CATS Level 2 backscatter coefficient and EARLINET. Three ISS overpasses close to the EARLINET stations of Leipzig, Germany; Évora, Portugal; and Dushanbe, Tajikistan, are analyzed here to demonstrate the performance of the CATS lidar system under different conditions. The results show that under cloud-free, relative homogeneous aerosol conditions, CATS is in good agreement with EARLINET, independent of daytime and nighttime conditions. CATS low negative biases are observed, partially attributed to the deficiency of lidar systems to detect tenuous aerosol layers of backscatter signal below the minimum detection thresholds; these are biases which may lead to systematic deviations and slight underestimations of the total aerosol optical depth (AOD) in climate studies. In addition, CATS misclassification of aerosol layers as clouds, and vice versa, in cases of coexistent and/or adjacent aerosol and cloud features, occasionally leads to non-representative, unrealistic, and cloud-contaminated aerosol profiles. Regarding solar illumination conditions, low negative biases in CATS backscatter coefficient profiles, of the order of 6.1%, indicate the good nighttime performance of CATS. During daytime, a reduced signal-to-noise ratio by solar background illumination prevents retrievals of weakly scattering atmospheric layers that would otherwise be detectable during nighttime, leading to higher negative biases, of the order of 22.3%. © Author(s) 2019.

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A methodology for cloud masking uncalibrated lidar signals

2018, Binietoglou, Ioannis, D’Amico, Giuseppe, Baars, Holger, Belegante, Livio, Marinou, Eleni, Nicolae, D., Makoto, A., Vassilis, A., Balis, D., Behrendt, A., Comeron, A., Gibert, F., Landulfo, E., McCormick, M.P., Senff, C., Veselovskii, I., Wandinger, U.

Most lidar processing algorithms, such as those included in EARLINET's Single Calculus Chain, can be applied only to cloud-free atmospheric scenes. In this paper, we present a methodology for masking clouds in uncalibrated lidar signals. First, we construct a reference dataset based on manual inspection and then train a classifier to separate clouds and cloud-free regions. Here we present details of this approach together with an example cloud masks from an EARLINET station.

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Lidar Ice nuclei estimates and how they relate with airborne in-situ measurements

2018, Marinou, Eleni, Amiridis, Vassilis, Ansmann, Albert, Nenes, Athanasios, Balis, Dimitris, Schrod, Jann, Binietoglou, Ioannis, Solomos, Stavros, Mamali, Dimitra, Engelmann, Ronny, Baars, Holger, Kottas, Michael, Tsekeri, Alexandra, Proestakis, Emmanouil, Kokkalis, Panagiotis, Goloub, Philippe, Cvetkovic, Bojan, Nichovic, Slobodan, Mamouri, Rodanthi, Pikridas, Michael, Stavroulas, Iasonas, Keleshis, Christos, Sciare, Jean

By means of available ice nucleating particle (INP) parameterization schemes we compute profiles of dust INP number concentration utilizing Polly-XT and CALIPSO lidar observations during the INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS 2016 campaign. The polarization-lidar photometer networking (POLIPHON) method is used to separate dust and non-dust aerosol backscatter, extinction, mass concentration, particle number concentration (for particles with radius > 250 nm) and surface area concentration. The INP final products are compared with aerosol samples collected from unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) and analyzed using the ice nucleus counter FRIDGE.

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GARRLiC and LIRIC: Strengths and limitations for the characterization of dust and marine particles along with their mixtures

2017, Tsekeri, Alexandra, Lopatin, Anton, Amiridis, Vassilis, Marinou, Eleni, Igloffstein, Julia, Siomos, Nikolaos, Solomos, Stavros, Kokkalis, Panagiotis, Engelmann, Ronny, Baars, Holger, Gratsea, Myrto, Raptis, Panagiotis I., Binietoglou, Ioannis, Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos, Kalivitis, Nikolaos, Kouvarakis, Giorgos, Bartsotas, Nikolaos, Kallos, George, Basart, Sara, Schuettemeyer, Dirk, Wandinger, Ulla, Ansmann, Albert, Chaikovsky, Anatoli P., Dubovik, Oleg

The Generalized Aerosol Retrieval from Radiometer and Lidar Combined data algorithm (GARRLiC) and the LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) provide the opportunity to study the aerosol vertical distribution by combining ground-based lidar and sun-photometric measurements. Here, we utilize the capabilities of both algorithms for the characterization of Saharan dust and marine particles, along with their mixtures, in the south-eastern Mediterranean during the CHARacterization of Aerosol mixtures of Dust and Marine origin Experiment (CHARADMExp). Three case studies are presented, focusing on dust-dominated, marinedominated and dust-marine mixing conditions. GARRLiC and LIRIC achieve a satisfactory characterization for the dust-dominated case in terms of particle microphysical properties and concentration profiles. The marine-dominated and the mixture cases are more challenging for both algorithms, although GARRLiC manages to provide more detailed microphysical retrievals compared to AERONET, while LIRIC effectively discriminates dust and marine particles in its concentration profile retrievals. The results are also compared with modelled dust and marine concentration profiles and surface in situ measurements.

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Retrieval of ice-nucleating particle concentrations from lidar observations and comparison with UAV in situ measurements

2019, Marinou, Eleni, Tesche, Matthias, Nenes, Athanasios, Ansmann, Albert, Schrod, Jann, Mamali, Dimitra, Tsekeri, Alexandra, Pikridas, Michael, Baars, Holger, Engelmann, Ronny, Voudouri, Kalliopi-Artemis, Solomos, Stavros, Sciare, Jean, Groß, Silke, Ewald, Florian, Amiridis, Vassilis

Aerosols that are efficient ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are crucial for the formation of cloud ice via heterogeneous nucleation in the atmosphere. The distribution of INPs on a large spatial scale and as a function of height determines their impact on clouds and climate. However, in situ measurements of INPs provide sparse coverage over space and time. A promising approach to address this gap is to retrieve INP concentration profiles by combining particle concentration profiles derived by lidar measurements with INP efficiency parameterizations for different freezing mechanisms (immersion freezing, deposition nucleation). Here, we assess the feasibility of this new method for both ground-based and spaceborne lidar measurements, using in situ observations collected with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and subsequently analyzed with the FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice nucleation Deposition freezinG Experiment) INP counter from an experimental campaign at Cyprus in April 2016. Analyzing five case studies we calculated the cloud-relevant particle number concentrations using lidar measurements (n250,dry with an uncertainty of 20 % to 40 % and Sdry with an uncertainty of 30 % to 50 %), and we assessed the suitability of the different INP parameterizations with respect to the temperature range and the type of particles considered. Specifically, our analysis suggests that our calculations using the parameterization of Ullrich et al. (2017) (applicable for the temperature range −50 to −33 ∘C) agree within 1 order of magnitude with the in situ observations of nINP; thus, the parameterization of Ullrich et al. (2017) can efficiently address the deposition nucleation pathway in dust-dominated environments. Additionally, our calculations using the combination of the parameterizations of DeMott et al. (2015, 2010) (applicable for the temperature range −35 to −9 ∘C) agree within 2 orders of magnitude with the in situ observations of INP concentrations (nINP) and can thus efficiently address the immersion/condensation pathway of dust and nondust particles. The same conclusion is derived from the compilation of the parameterizations of DeMott et al. (2015) for dust and Ullrich et al. (2017) for soot.

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Ice nucleating particles over the Eastern Mediterranean measured by unmanned aircraft systems

2017, Schrod, Jann, Weber, Daniel, Drücke, Jaqueline, Keleshis, Christos, Pikridas, Michael, Ebert, Martin, Cvetković, Bojan, Nickovic, Slobodan, Marinou, Eleni, Baars, Holger, Ansmann, Albert, Vrekoussis, Mihalis, Mihalopoulos, Nikos, Sciare, Jean, Curtius, Joachim, Bingemer, Heinz G.

During an intensive field campaign on aerosol, clouds, and ice nucleation in the Eastern Mediterranean in April 2016, we measured the abundance of ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the lower troposphere from unmanned aircraft systems (UASs). Aerosol samples were collected by miniaturized electrostatic precipitators onboard the UASs at altitudes up to 2.5 km. The number of INPs in these samples, which are active in the deposition and condensation modes at temperatures from -20 to -30 °C, were analyzed immediately after collection on site using the ice nucleus counter FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice nucleation Deposition freezinG Experiment). During the 1-month campaign, we encountered a series of Saharan dust plumes that traveled at several kilometers' altitude. Here we present INP data from 42 individual flights, together with aerosol number concentrations, observations of lidar backscattering, dust concentrations derived by the dust transport model DREAM (Dust Regional Atmospheric Model), and results from scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the dust plumes is reflected by the coincidence of INPs with the particulate matter (PM), the lidar signal, and the predicted dust mass of the model. This suggests that mineral dust or a constituent related to dust was a major contributor to the ice nucleating properties of the aerosol. Peak concentrations of above 100 INPs std L-1 were measured at -30 °C. The INP concentration in elevated plumes was on average a factor of 10 higher than at ground level. Since desert dust is transported for long distances over wide areas of the globe predominantly at several kilometers' altitude, we conclude that INP measurements at ground level may be of limited significance for the situation at the level of cloud formation.

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Vertical profiles of aerosol mass concentration derived by unmanned airborne in situ and remote sensing instruments during dust events

2018, Mamali, Dimitra, Marinou, Eleni, Sciare, Jean, Pikridas, Michael, Kokkalis, Panagiotis, Kottas, Michael, Binietoglou, Ioannis, Tsekeri, Alexandra, Keleshis, Christos, Engelmann, Ronny, Baars, Holger, Ansmann, Albert, Amiridis, Vassilis, Russchenberg, Herman, Biskos, George

In situ measurements using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and remote sensing observations can independently provide dense vertically resolved measurements of atmospheric aerosols, information which is strongly required in climate models. In both cases, inverting the recorded signals to useful information requires assumptions and constraints, and this can make the comparison of the results difficult. Here we compare, for the first time, vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) observations and in situ measurements using an optical particle counter on board a UAV during moderate and weak Saharan dust episodes. Agreement between the two measurement methods was within experimental uncertainty for the coarse mode (i.e. particles having radii > 0.5 μm), where the properties of dust particles can be assumed with good accuracy. This result proves that the two techniques can be used interchangeably for determining the vertical profiles of aerosol concentrations, bringing them a step closer towards their systematic exploitation in climate models.

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Aerosol absorption profiling from the synergy of lidar and sun-photometry: The ACTRIS-2 campaigns in Germany, Greece and Cyprus

2018, Tsekeri, Alexandra, Amiridis, Vassilis, Lopatin, Anton, Marinou, Eleni, Giannakaki, Eleni, Pikridas, Michael, Sciare, Jean, Liakakou, Eleni, Gerasopoulos, Evangelos, Duesing, Sebastian, Corbin, Joel C., Gysel, Martin, Bukowiecki, Nicolas, Baars, Holger, Engelmann, Ronny, Wehner, Birgit, Kottas, Michael, Mamali, Dimitra, Kokkalis, Panagiotis, Raptis, Panagiotis I., Stavroulas, Iasonas, Keleshis, Christos, Müller, Detlef, Solomos, Stavros, Binietoglou, Ioannis, Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos, Papayannis, Alexandros, Stachlewska, Iwona S., Igloffstein, Julia, Wandinger, Ulla, Ansmann, Albert, Dubovik, Oleg, Goloub, Philippe, Nicolae, D., Makoto, A., Vassilis, A., Balis, D., Behrendt, A., Comeron, A., Gibert, F., Landulfo, E., McCormick, M.P., Senff, C., Veselovskii, I., Wandinger, U.

Aerosol absorption profiling is crucial for radiative transfer calculations and climate modelling. Here, we utilize the synergy of lidar with sun-photometer measurements to derive the absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo profiles during the ACTRIS-2 campaigns held in Germany, Greece and Cyprus. The remote sensing techniques are compared with in situ measurements in order to harmonize and validate the different methodologies and reduce the absorption profiling uncertainties.